Building Public Slack Communities – Slackvite Launch

I had the urge to build and ship something since I gave Hey Kramer to the world.

Bot Slack RTM API

Something … useful.

Since I was already elbows deep in the Slack API, I decided to build a thing that lets you “launch and manage public Slack communities in 30 seconds”. I say “manage” liberally because at this point it does none of that (the ideas list is already getting long).

But, you can launch a fancy pants landing page that pulls beautiful background photos from Unsplash to gather invites for your public Slack community. So, that’s a start I suppose.

Public Slack Community Invite

Is this a new idea? No.

There are a couple excellent solutions for building a public Slack community platform. For instance if you are reading this you’ve probably already stumbled on Slackin. It’s a great solution, however I built Slackvite for those of you that get scared away by landing on a Github page. If seeing ‘.travis.yml’ and ‘app.json’ files frightens you then you might like this.

There’s also the also very capable and popular Typeform hack for creating a Slack community. But again – if code scares you it’s not for you.

With Slackvite you just 1) register 2) connect with Slack 3) select your team 4) launch your public invite landing page to the world. Here’s a demo for an Iowa State Cyclones Slack community.

Slackvite Public Slack Community Invite Landing Page

Style Disqus Comments in Twenty Fifteen Theme

I’ve recently moved several of my content based WordPress sites over to the Twenty Fifteen theme. It’s just so clean and neat … and focuses on content rather than features. Paired with Jetpack you can run a pretty awesome blog.

Anyway when I started applying this theme to my sites already integrated with the Disqus comment system I noticed the style was all off. A bit of Googling found me at Alex’s website reading about how I can apply some custom CSS to fix the issue. That’s awesome but not a simple feat for your average WordPress user and somewhat of an annoyance for someone that doesn’t want to install a Custom CSS plugin or create a child theme just to apply some custom CSS rules.

So … I turned it into a WordPress plugin to make it easy to fix for everyone. Hats off to Alex Dresko and ultimately Joshua Granick whose CSS I actually used  (he left a comment on Alex’s post – which runs on Disqus… how meta).

Before

Twenty Fifteen Disqus Comments

After

Twenty Fifteen Disqus Style

 

Download on WordPress.org / Fork on Github

Zendesk Helpdesk Widget in WordPress Admin

When managing dozens of WordPress sites for dozens of different users, streamlining the support process using an excellent help desk system quickly becomes a priority.

If you are not familiar with Zendesk, it’s a help desk / ticketing system on steroids allowing you to manage support requests, setup response macros, manage a knowledge base, and more.

My Admin Zendesk Help Widget plugin (ya … bad name) utilizes Zendesk’s web widget which you can configure via a simple plugin settings page. Customizing the widget is easy in your Zendesk dashboard – you can change the colors, position of the Help button, and much more. Information about the current logged in user auto populates the fields and when a user submits a support requests it shows you what page the request was made from in the Zendesk ticket.

Installing, activating, and configuring the plugin can be done in 60 seconds. All you need is a Zendesk account and to know your subdomain (that will make sense if you have already signed up).

Download on WordPress Plugin Repository / Fork on Github

Add Terms and Conditions to Restrict Content Pro

TL;DR – I wrote a WordPress plugin to add Terms and Conditions to the registration form when using the Restrict Content Pro plugin .

I just recently built a WordPress membership site using the Restrict Content Pro plugin and a few add-ons. However since they were taking money (via Stripe) in the registration process the user wanted a terms and conditions checkbox to ensure the customer knew what they were getting with the membership.

I figured this might come in handy so I built and released a plugin for it.

Upon installation and activation, you will see a new submenu item under “Restrict” called “Terms”.

RCP - Terms and Conditions

Under “Terms” you will see a simple admin settings page that allows you to set the label for the Terms and Conditions checkbox that shows up on the registration form as well as the link to your terms and conditions (whether that’s a page on your site or a PDF on a CDN).

RCP Terms Settings

The code and idea for the plugin is loosely based on this blog post Add a Agree to Our Terms of Use Field to Restrict Content Pro from @pippinsplugins.

Plugin code on Github: Restrict Content Pro Terms and Conditions

Install via WordPress Plugin repo: Restrict Content Pro – Terms and Conditions

WordPress Plugin: Open Files In New Tab or Window

On a recent WordPress project I had a requirement that any files be opened in a new tab or window. Now this can be easily accomplished by the users when they create the post or page by linking to the file and marking the checkbox “Open Link In A New Window/Tab”. But we all know users can’t be trusted so in order to “double check” them I wrote a WordPress plugin that will hunt the page for anchor tags that link to something with a file extension, and simply add “target=’_blank'” to them.

Basically all the plugin does is enqueue a jQuery script that does the work. I got the idea to use the jQuery .filter() method from @nickf and the regular expression (because I suck at them) from @már-Örlygsson.

jQuery Open Files In New Tab Or Window

Links and References

Fork On Github

WordPress Plugin Page

jQuery Script

Stackoverflow: Javascript regex for matching/extracting file extension

Stackoverflow: jQuery Selector Regular Expressions